Carrot ginger soup brightens your day

Being a student of nutrition, I was intrigued by a recent give-away in our Buy Nothing neighborhood Facebook group. A member was offering a book with the intimidating title, “The Ultra-Metabolism Cookbook.” I have discovered over several years of trying to encourage families to forego processed foods in favor of healthy meals that people are hooked on the foods they grew up loving. It takes a LOT to get them to consider changes. I wondered whether this recipe book could make a good stab at getting people to consider a regular infusion of fruits, veggies, and good quality protein and carbs.

The seven keys to making your metabolism function well, according to this doctor, Mark Hyman, are

  • controlling appetite
  • lowering stress
  • reducing inflammation
  • preventing damage from oxygen, AKA keeping your cells from rusting from the inside out
  • burning calories
  • strengthening thyroid fuction
  • helping the liver do its intended job

But people won’t care about any of that if the food doesn’t taste good, if the ingredients are unfamiliar, and, especially these days, if food prep takes too long.

Hyman takes care of food prep hangups by posting tricks to make shopping, preparing and cooking meals easier. Healthier eating does mean forming new habits and, perhaps, making more of an effort in the kitchen than you are used to. You WILL have to make some changes. But the results for you and your family are worth it.

Hyman’s recipes look easy and they contain foods that promise to deliver on the good doctor’s seven keys to a healthy metabolism. In no time you will feel less stress, maintain a healthier weight, and find more energy. Best yet, a more efficient immune system can help you better fight off those nasty viruses that are making life miserable for most of us these days.

To test things out, I chose a tantalizing recipe for carrot ginger soup. It is made with lots of spices, herbs and foods that derive from nuts and seeds. All these things are chock full of healthiness. You can easily make this dish vegetarian and dairy free, if that’s your thing. I can attest to it being super delicious!

Carrot Ginger soup

Makes 4 large bowls for lunch or 8 small cups for appetisers. Can easily be doubled and frozen for another time.

  • 1 tablespoon sesame seed oil
  • 1 medium onion, peeled and diced (about 1/2 cup)
  • 1 tablespoon fresh ginger, scrubbed and minced
  • 1 pound carrots, peeled and sliced into coins
  • 1 medium clove of garlic, peeled and minced (about 1 teaspoon)
  • 3 cups low sodium chicken or vegetable broth (I use our home-made bone broth)
  • 1/3 cup cream (or canned unsweetened coconut milk)
  • salt to taste (up to 1/4 teaspoon)
  • 1 teaspoon fresh lime juice
  • 1/8 teaspoon red chili paste (or to taste)
  • 2 tablespoons fresh cilantro, leaves finely chopped
  • 1 green onion, thinly sliced
  1. Prepare the above ingredients, all washed, cleaned, chopped, and measured
  2. Heat the oil in a heavy-bottomed large pot, over medium heat
  3. Add the onion and ginger and cook for 3 minutes, until the onion is translucent
  4. Add the carrot coins and cook for 2 minutes
  5. Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute
  6. Add the broth, cream and salt. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and boil gently for 25 minutes, until the carrots are tender. Remove from heat and allow to cool slightly
  7. Using an emersion hand blender, puree the soup until it is smooth and creamy
  8. Add the lime juice and chili paste and adjust the seasonings. You may need more salt and more broth to achieve your desired consistency
  9. Serve the soup in bowls or cups and garnish with the chopped cilantro and green onion. I didn’t have these on hand, so I used fresh dill and basil from my kitchen window.

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