Can egg whites be blue? Believe it, or NOT!

Lovely murre egg

You can’t believe everything you read…  But there is always a grain of truth behind every lie. And the Internet is a wonderful tool for digging out the facts.

Ripley’s Believe It or Not (in an edition dated in the 1950s) claims the cooked whites of murre eggs are blue and the yolks are red.  Vinny loves unusual foods, so he wanted to taste these colorful  eggs for himself. But when he searched for scientific evidence, nowhere could he confirm the blue color of cooked murre eggs.

What he did find out is that  murres are cute little birds that look a lot like penguins. They live in large numbers in the north and as far south as California, off the coast in the Pacific Ocean.

During the gold rush, when fresh food was scarce for hordes of visitors out to find their fortune on the west coast of America, hunters prized the beautiful turquoise eggs of murres. Maybe people confused reports about the color of the shells with the color of the whites.  We do know that sulfur in eggs increases with age or when cooked at overly high heat, turning the whites blue. So maybe the  eggs just went bad!

But how could Vinny find out what fresh murre eggs really look and taste like? He couldn’t just go buy some at the local super market.  Thanks to You Tube, Vinny found a video showing some folks hunting murre eggs on steep cliffs in the Pacific where the murres breed. And he just asked them! Ryan’s sister  says, “Murre eggs…  are delicious. The [cooked] egg whites are the same color as a chicken’s, but the yolk is a little darker—almost an orangish-yellowish color.”  Maurice Analook tells Vinny the cooked yolks he tried had rings of red.

In Canada murres are a prized food source for people in Newfoundland. Stay tuned and Vinny will show you a recipe Newfoundlanders use for cooking up murre. He’ll also explain how you can make blue eggs for yourselves and astound your friends with your culinary skills. Eggciting!

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